Vote for Our Planet, Part 2

Knowing how to vote to protect the planet isn’t as easy as it should be, so we want to do our part to make it a little bit easier. Before casting your votes, we hope you’ll take advantage of these resources to get informed and support the candidates committed to protecting our earth.

Published on: November 2, 2020

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At 1 Hotels, we know that protecting the natural world is essential to our own existence and to the protection of all communities. Knowing how to vote to protect the planet isn’t as easy as it should be, so we want to do our part to make it a little bit easier. Last month, we shared the importance of voting for our planet and urged you to get out and vote. With this year’s election now just one day away, we hope you’ve made your voting plan and imagine that, like the rest of our country, you're now grappling with all of the different candidates, propositions, measures, and positions. Before casting your votes, we hope you’ll take advantage of these resources to get informed and support the candidates committed to protecting our our communities and the environment we depend on.

The Big One: Climate Change

The majority of America is with you in realizing that climate change is one of the most important issues of our day. With Election Day nearly upon us, climate change has finally risen to the top of the voting priority list. The majority of registered voters in the United States say climate change will be a very important (42%) or somewhat important (26%) issue in making their decision about whom to vote for in the presidential election (source).

What, then, can we expect from the presidential candidates in terms of climate action? 
• The Carbon Brief shared a summary of the Democratic and Republican candidates’ positions on US climate and energy policy that will help you understand their key differences.
• The New York Times also made an interactive “Field Guide” to the election and climate change that walks through major points of the debate that are essential to real climate action like, how long we have to act, how much it will cost and the role of government intervention to address climate change.
• Marie Clare lays out "What's at Stake" for the environment more broadly - the impact each candidate’s policies will have on other aspects of our planet, like clean air and water.

To safeguard our water, air, land, and wildlife, vote local too.

The executive branch has a huge impact on our environmental priorities, from the funding available for conservation efforts to mobilizing the large-scale energy shifts we need. But we know that so many environmental issues are deeply local, and our local officials are essential to protecting our lands, water, people, and wildlife.

How can you prepare to vote for the local candidates and measures that are essential to protecting our environment?
• There are many free resources available to help you understand your ballot and the positions of each candidate, proposition, measure and initiative. Ballotpedia is a great starting point to see comparisons side-by-side. If you have a favorite local organization, like your League of Conservation Voters or Sierra Club chapter, for example, you can also look at what endorsements they’ve made for your local election.
• Look for the commitments from your existing or incumbent candidates around the environment, climate change, and fossil fuels. The “No Fossil Fuel Money” Pledge tracks which members of congress have agreed to not accept any contributions from  fossil fuel companies. Grist has a sortable “My Climate Candidate” tracker that extends far beyond the presidential race. 

Above all, make sure you take the time to vote this year.

Be safe at the polls. And be well as we wait to hear the results.

To minimize the use of plastic in your own life, look around your home and work to identify plastic items. From there, seek to find alternatives.